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Thursday, July 23, 2020 | History

2 edition of Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays. found in the catalog.

Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays.

Mary Marguerite Butler

Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays.

by Mary Marguerite Butler

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Published by Philosophical Library in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Hrotsvitha, ca. 935-ca. 975.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 227-234.

    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPA8340 .B8
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxviii, 234 p.
    Number of Pages234
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL5800385M
    LC Control Number60013637
    OCLC/WorldCa592382

    The history of theatre charts the development of theatre over the past 2, years. While performative elements are present in every society, it is customary to acknowledge a distinction between theatre as an art form and entertainment and theatrical or performative elements in other activities. The history of theatre is primarily concerned with the origin and subsequent development of the. - Give Joan a Sword [50 poems inspired from her trip to Europe in ] — M. Therese, Sr / pref. by Jacques Maritain $ - Give Joan a Sword [50 poems inspired from her trip to Europe in ] — M. Therese, Sr / pref. by Jacques Maritain $ - God's Frontier [novel of a young Spanish railway worker suddenly finding himself at times working miracles, the scene of these extraordinary.

    [4] 这方面论述较全面的是 Sister Mary Marguerite Butler: Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays, New York: Philosophical Lib., 。 [5] 参见 Hroswitha of Gandersheim: Her Life, Times and Works, and a Comprehensive Bibliography (Anne Lyon Haight ed.), New York: The Hroswitha Club, , pp. 。.   Busygin, Viktor, , “The Lithuanian Mime School. Modris Tenisons,” essay posted on the website The Mime Club, excerpted from Busygin’s book Aikido Made Me Strong While Mime Made Me Happy, online: Butler, Mary Marguerite, , Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays, New York: Philosophical Library.

    Ἡ ϵ̓ν Κρήτη συνωμοσία τοῦ Σήφη Βλαστοῦ () καὶ ἡ νϵ́α συνωμοτικὴ κίνησις τοῦ [The Conspiracy of Sēphēs Vlastos in Crete () and .   (1) See, for example, Mary Marguerite Butler, Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays (New York, ), 72; C. Clifford Flanigan, 'Medieval Liturgy and the Arts. Visitatio Sepulchri as Paradigm', in Liturgy and the Arts in the Middle Ages, eds Eva Louise Lillie and Nils Holger Peterson (Copenhagen, ), ; and Glynne Wickham, The.


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Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays by Mary Marguerite Butler Download PDF EPUB FB2

Hrotsvitha primarily wrote legends, comedies, and plays. Her Books of Legends or Carmina liber primus was written in the s or s and was written in honor of Abbess Gerberga. It contains eight legends written in dactylic hexameter. Her most popular work was The Book of Drama—or liber Secundus, which offered a Christian alternative to the.

Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality Of Her Plays [Mary Marguerite Butler, William P. Halstead] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays. New York, Philosophical Library [] (OCoLC) Online version: Butler, Mary Marguerite, Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays.

New York, Philosophical Library [] (OCoLC) Named Person: Hrotsvitha; Hrotsvit (von Gandersheim); Hrotsvitha: Document Type: Book: All Authors. From inside the book. What people are saying - Write a review. We haven't found any reviews in the usual places. 6 other sections not shown. Other editions - View all.

Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays Mary Marguerite Butler Snippet view - Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays. book Marguerite Butler No preview available. About this Book Catalog Record Details. Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays / by Sister Mary Butler, Mary Marguerite, View full catalog record.

Rights: Public Domain, Google-digitized. Hrotsvitha of GandersheimGerman-born Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim (c. ) was one of the first known female playwrights in Europe. A Benedictine nun ensconced in a renowned monastery that served as a center of learning and culture in medieval Germany, Hrotsvitha wrote poetry as well as six plays that drew heavily from classical sources and Christian lore.

During her lifetime, Hrosvitha divided her own works into three manuscripts: Book of Legends, Book of Drama, and Epics (dates uncertain). The legends and plays still exist, but the two works included in Epics are lost. Very few details are known about Hrosvitha’s life and those that are known are often disputed.

This book, part of Macmillan's New Middle Ages series, Mary Marguerite Butler, Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays (New York, ), 72; C.

Religious drama and ecclesiastical reform in the Tenth Century (Look for her in libran catalogs as Hrotsvitha.) Annie Dillard, Sandra Cisneros, Julia Alverez, and Mary Gordon are some of the. TheGesta Ottonis, which tells the story of Saxon rule in Germany from the accession of Henry I to Otto Iʼs imperial coronation in Rome, is in many ways the most perplexing work of Hrotsvit of Gandersheimʼs literaryeven more than thePrimordia, her history of Gandersheim, calls for placement within a historical the poems and plays appear as stories Hrotsvit uses for.

Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays. By SISTER MARY MARGUERITE BUTLER, R. New York: Philosophical Li-brary, Pp. xviii++3 pls.+6 figs. +frontispiece. $ No other medieval author perhaps has been so strangely misrepresented (her name, which she herself spelled "Hrotsvit" [nom.], included) as Roswitha of Ganders.

Thomas Merton wrote The Silent Life a decade after he took orders. In his Prologue, Merton describes the book as "a meditation on the monastic life by one who, without any merit of his own, is privileged to know that life on the inside who seeks only to speak as the mouthpiece of a tradition centuries old." It is a remarkable work-one that combines a lucid and informative description of 5/5(1).

Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays. BUTLER, Sister Mary Marguerite Published by NY, Philosophical Lib xviii, pp; f/p, 4 pls, 4 text plans.

The plays of Roswitha by Hrotsvitha (Book) Las ocho leyendas by Hrotsvitha () Hroswitha of Gandersheim; her life, times, and works, and a comprehensive bibliography by Anne Lyon Haight (Book). An Essay for Performance History by Santana Berryman Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim (c) is considered to be the first female playwright in the history of theatre.

She is one of the key playwrights of the Middle Ages, and the only known female playwright of the era. Her work is impressive in its scope of influences. AUTHORITIES. Below are references indicating presence of this name in another database or other reference material.

Most of the sources listed are encyclopedic in nature but might be limited to a specific field, such as musicians or film directors. Magnin's assertions concerning the theatricality of the plays.

The title of M. Butler's book Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality ofHer Plays testifies to her opinion. Bean, "Terence Chastened: Two Character Types from the Plays ofHrotsvitha ofAuthor: Joann MacLauchlan Bean.

Hrotsvitha (c. – c. ), also known as Hroswitha, Hrotsvit, Hrosvit, and Roswitha, was a 10th-century German secular canoness, as well as a dramatist and poet who lived and worked in Abbey of Gandersheim, in modern-day Lower Saxony, a community of secular name, as she herself attests, is Saxon for "strong voice." [1]She wrote in Latin, and is considered by some to be the.

Scenes and Machines on the English Stage during the Renaissance, by Lily B. Campbell, Barnes and Noble, New York,pp. Price $ Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays, by Sister Mary Marguerite Butler, Philosophical Library, Inc., New York,pp.

Price $ Saint Bride and Her Book: Birgitta of Sweden's Revelations. Trans. Julia Bolton Holloway. The Plays of Hrotswitha of Gandersheim. Trans. Larissa Bonfante. New York: New York University Press, (Robbins PAA12b ) Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays.

Diss., University of Michigan, (Stacks PAB8). Hrotsvitha was noted for her great learning and was introduced to Roman writers by Gerberga.

Hrotsvitha's work shows familiarity not only with the Church fathers, but also with classical poetry, including Virgil, Horace, Ovid, Plautus and Terence (on whom her own verse was modeled). Several of her plays draw on the so-called apocryphal gospels. Book Reviews.

Aristotle's History of Athenian Democracy. James Day and Mortimer Chambers. Donald Kagan. 59(3), pp. – Hrotsvitha: The Theatricality of Her Plays. Mary Marguerite Butler. Helena M. Gamer. 59(3), pp. – First Page | PDF ( KB) | Permissions.The Hroswitha Club of women book collectors was founded in New York City in and took its name from a 10th century female German poet (Hrotsvitha, ca.

ca. ). Meetings were scheduled three to four times a year during the winter months and held at the homes of members as well as at major libraries and private collections, mainly in the. If Hrotsvit had insisted on true rhymes the lines would have been tedious, instead her rhyme and rhythm creates a kind of harmony and gentle pace.

NOTES (0) In Marguerite Butler called her book Hrotsvitha: the theatricality of her plays. Searching the JSTOR database for ‘Marguerite Butler’ will lead the reader to several outdated reviews.